ADD SOME TEXT THROUGH CUSTOMIZER
Science Curriculum
Home Curriculum Subjects

Science Curriculum

Statement

Subject Intent Statement:

  • To give students the knowledge and scientific literacy, to allow students to understand and explain the world around them. To allow students to understand the ethical implications of scientific discoveries.
  •  To give students skills to allow them to interpret data and make un biased factual decisions based on data. Use creative thinking to develop and challenge scientific models and theories.
  • To ensure that students have the academic currency to continue on their learning journey.

Year 7AutumnSpringSummer
TOPICSIntroduction to scienceOrganismsWavesMatter(taught on rotation)EarthForcesGenesReactions(taught on rotation)EcosystemsEnergyElectromagnets(taught on rotation)
KNOWLEDGE TAUGHTIntroduction to science: Health and safety in a laboratory, hazard symbols, basic scientific equipment, using an Bunsen burner Organisms: Animal and plant cells and their adaptations, unicellular organisms, organisation in organisms, muscular-skeletal system, joints and movement. Waves: Understanding how sound travels, reflects and absorption, the ear and how we hear. Understanding light, including reflection and refraction and coloured light.  Matter: States of matter and particle models, changes of state and diffusion. Separating mixtures, solutions and chromatography.Earth: Structure of Earth, rock cycle, the Universe, stars and galaxies, exploring space, Earths motion, solar system, day and night, seasons and eclipses. Forces: Understanding speed and distance-time graphs. Motions and forces involved, gravitational fields, mass, weight and gravity. Genes: Variation, reproduction and fertility, development of a foetus, smoking and pregnancy.  Reactions: Using metals and non-metals, reactions of acids and metals, oxidation and displacement reactions. Acids and alkalis, indicators and neutralisation.Ecosystems: Food webs, toxins in the environment, insects and ecological balance, flowering plants and reproduction in flowers, seeds and seed dispersal. Energy: Cost of energy in the home, electricity use, energy transfer in fuels, generating electricity, energy stores and transfers, and potential, kinetic and elastic energy. Electromagnets: Energy in circuits, resistance, series and parallel circuits. Static electricity. Understanding electric fields.  
SKILLS DEVELOPED(Include any trips and visits.)Using models Planning and carrying out investigationsNaming and using scientific equipmentRisk assessmentsEvaluate methodsNaming equipmentIdentifying variablesMaking predictionsRisk assessmentsNaming and using scientific equipmentRecording dataUsing modelsNaming and using scientific equipmentCarrying out investigationsMaking predictionsBuilding circuitsKnowledge of circuit symbolsKnowledge of units Applying equations Risk assessmentsUsing models
ASSESSMENTS(Minimum two per half term, with focussed marking.)Baseline assessmentOrganisms mini topic testWaves mini topic testMatter mini topic testEarth mini topic test Forces mini topic testGenes mini topic testReactions mini topic testEcosystems mini topic testEnergy mini topic testElectromagnets mini topic test Trust assessment
HOME LEARNING(To be made available via Century Tech; one per week.)Yr7 Term 1 homework bookletGCSE podYr7 Term 2 homework bookletGCSE podYr7 Term 3 homework bookletGCSE pod
KS2 National Curriculum – Working scientificallyAsking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer themSetting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair testsMaking systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggersGathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questionsRecording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tablesReporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusionsUsing results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questionsIdentifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processesUsing straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findingsPlanning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessaryTaking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriateRecording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphsUsing test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair testsReporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentationsIdentifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.
KS2 National CurriculumAnimals Identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat Identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement. Describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans Identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions Describe the changes as humans develop to old age.Identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood Recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function Describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans. LightRecognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of lightNotice that light is reflected from surfacesRecognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyesRecognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by an opaque objectFind patterns in the way that the size of shadows change.Recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eyeExplain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them. SoundIdentify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibratingRecognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the earFind patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced itFind patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced itRecognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases States of matterCompare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gasesObserve that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled, and measure or research the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius (°c)Identify the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature.Describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a birdDescribe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals. Properties and changes of materialsCompare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets Know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution Use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating Give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic Demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes Explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda.  KS2 National CurriculumEarth and spaceDescribe the movement of the earth, and other planets, relative to the sun in the solar system Describe the movement of the moon relative to the earth Describe the sun, earth and moon as approximately spherical bodies Use the idea of the earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky. RocksCompare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical propertiesDescribe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rockRecognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter. ForcesCompare how things move on different surfaces Notice that some forces need contact between two objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance Observe how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials and not others Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials Describe magnets as having two polesPredict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing. Explain that unsupported objects fall towards the earth because of the force of gravity acting between the earth and the falling objectIdentify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfacesRecognise that some mechanisms, including levers, pulleys and gears, allow a smaller force to have a greater effect. Evolution and inheritanceRecognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the earth millions of years ago Recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents Identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution. KS2 National CurriculumLiving things and their habitatsRecognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of waysExplore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environmentRecognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.Describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animalsGive reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics.Construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey. PlantsIdentify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowersExplore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant Investigate the way in which water is transported within plants Explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of  ElectricityIdentify common appliances that run on electricityConstruct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzersIdentify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a batteryRecognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuitRecognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors.Associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit Compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches Use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram. 
SCHEMAS (Where might students learn about elements of this topic in other subjects? Which subjects might this topic feed into beyond your own?)Organisms – HAL (fitness, movement) Waves – Music (sound), Art (colour), Maths (Interpreting graphs, using equations) Matter – DT (materials)Earth – Geography (Earth structure, volcanoes) Forces – Maths (Speed, distance and time, interpreting graphs, using equations) Genes – Health and Social Care GCSE (development of a baby)Ecosystems – Geography (habitats, adaptations, food chains) Energy – HAL (kinetic energy), Maths (Interpreting graphs, using equations) Electromagnets – DT (electronics)
CAREERS LINKS(How might this benefit them in the future?)Science enables students to make sense and question the world around them and develop an understanding of the ethical implications and social impact of scientific discoveries. By using creative thinking students can develop and challenge scientific models and theories. Science will equip students with the necessary skills to process data and make unbiased factual judgements. Example careers include: medicine, pharmacy, research, education and engineering.Science enables students to make sense and question the world around them and develop an understanding of the ethical implications and social impact of scientific discoveries. By using creative thinking students can develop and challenge scientific models and theories. Science will equip students with the necessary skills to process data and make unbiased factual judgements. Example careers include: medicine, pharmacy, research, education and engineering.Science enables students to make sense and question the world around them and develop an understanding of the ethical implications and social impact of scientific discoveries. By using creative thinking students can develop and challenge scientific models and theories. Science will equip students with the necessary skills to process data and make unbiased factual judgements. Example careers include: medicine, pharmacy, research, education and engineering.

Year 8
AutumnSpringSummer
TOPICSOrganismsWavesMatter(taught on rotation)         EarthForcesGenesReactions(taught on rotation)EcosystemsEnergyElectromagnets(taught on rotation)
KNOWLEDGE TAUGHTOrganisms: Breathing, human gas exchange system, impact of exercise, asthma and smoking on the gas exchange system, healthy diet, obesity, starvation, deficiency diseases, human digestive system Waves: Understanding frequencies, echoes, reflection and absorption of sound, the auditory range of different species, ultrasound, microphones, loudspeakers, exploring UV light, understanding reflection, refraction and absorption of light by materials, comparing transverse and longitudinal waves, using water waves to model wave behaviour Matter: The development of the Periodic Table, properties of metals and non-metals, predicting patterns using physical and chemical properties, understanding differences between atoms, elements and compounds, using chemical symbols and formulae, exploring properties of other materials, such as polymers, ceramics and composites.         Earth: Understanding our atmosphere, the carbon cycle, exploring how human activity is impact on climate, global warming, recycling, extracting metals, reactivity series Forces: Understanding equilibrium, investigating drag, friction and resistance, investigating Hooke’s Law, exploring and calculating pressure Genes: Natural selection, understanding the importance of biodiversity, extinction, understanding genetic material and the role played by different scientists, variation, modelling inheritance Reactions: Investigating exothermic and endothermic reactions, explaining the use of catalysts, exploring different types of reactions, combustion, fuels and energy resources, thermal decomposition, conservation of mass, oxidation, state symbols, using chemical symbols and chemical formulae. Ecosystems: Exploring and comparing aerobic and anaerobic respiration, respiration in sport, investigating fermentation, investigating photosynthesis, exploring adaptation of leaves, movement of water and minerals in plant, exploring the importance of minerals to plants Energy: Understanding and calculating work done, exploring how to make work easier, explaining thermal energy and heating, exploring conduction, convection, radiation and insulation Electromagnets: Exploring Earth’s magnetism, compass and navigation, investigating electromagnetism, investigating the strength of electromagnets
SKILLS DEVELOPED(Include any trips and visits.)Working Scientifically  OrganismsAnalyse patternsDiscuss limitationsDraw conclusionsPresent dataCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsCritique claimsJustify opinionsDevise questionsPlan variablesTest hypothesesInterrogate sources WavesAnalyse patternsDiscuss limitationsDraw conclusionsCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsJustify opinionsDevise questionsTest hypothesesExamine consequences Matter Analyse patternsDiscuss limitationsDraw conclusionsPresent dataCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsCollect dataDevise questionsTest hypothesesEstimate risksReview theories                    Working Scientifically  Earth Analyse patternsDiscuss limitationsDraw conclusionsPresent dataCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsCritique claimsJustify opinionsCollect dataEstimate risksExamine consequencesReview theories ForcesAnalyse patternsDiscuss limitationsDraw conclusionsPresent dataCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsCollect dataDevise questionsPlan variablesTest hypotheses GenesAnalyse patternsDiscuss limitationsDraw conclusionsPresent dataCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsCritique claimsJustify opinionsExamine consequencesReview theoriesInterrogate sources ReactionsOrganismsAnalyse patternsDiscuss limitationsDraw conclusionsPresent dataCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsCritique claimsJustify opinionsCollect dataDevise questionsPlan variablesTest hypothesesEstimate risksExamine consequences Working Scientifically  Ecosystems Analyse patternsDiscuss limitationsDraw conclusionsPresent dataCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsCritique claimsJustify opinionsCollect dataDevise questionsPlan variablesTest hypothesesEstimate risksExamine consequences EnergyAnalyse patternsDiscuss limitationsDraw conclusionsPresent dataCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsCritique claimsJustify opinionsCollect dataDevise questionsPlan variablesTest hypothesesExamine consequencesInterrogate sources ElectromagnetsAnalyse patternsDraw conclusionsPresent dataCommunicate ideasConstruct explanationsCollect dataDevise questionsPlan variablesTest hypothesesEstimate risks  
ASSESSMENTS(Minimum two per half term, with focussed marking.)Baseline assessmentOrganisms mini topic testWaves mini topic testMatter mini topic test              Earth mini topic test Forces mini topic testGenes mini topic testReactions mini topic testEcosystems mini topic testEnergy mini topic testElectromagnets mini topic test Trust assessment
HOME LEARNING(To be made available via Century Tech; one per week.)Yr8 Term 1 homework bookletGCSE pod Yr8 Term 2 homework bookletGCSE pod Yr8 Term 2 homework bookletGCSE pod 
SEQUENCING (What must students already have been taught in order to begin to learn this topic? Identify opportunities to address knowledge gaps)Organisms Year 7 topic8.1 Exploring the human skeleton8.2 Understanding the role of joints and muscles8.3 Examining interacting muscles8.4 Exploring problems with the skeletal system8.5 Understanding organisation of organisms8.6 Describing animal and plant cells8.7 Understanding adaptations of cells8.8 Exploring cells8.9 Understanding unicellular organisms Waves Year 7 topic4.1 Exploring sound4.2 Describing sound4.3 Hearing sounds4.4 Understanding how sound travels through materials4.5 Learning about the reflection andabsorption of sound 4.6 Exploring properties of light 4.7 Exploring reflection4.8 Exploring refraction4.9 Seeing clearly4.10 Exploring coloured light Matter Year 7 topic5.1 Using particles to explain matter5.2 Understanding solids5.3 Understanding liquids and gases5.4 Exploring diffusion5.5 Explaining changes of state5.6 Separating mixtures5.7 Exploring solutions5.8 Understanding distillation5.9 Exploring chromatography   Earth Year 7 topic7.1 Understanding the structure of the Earth7.2 Exploring igneous rocks7.3 Exploring sedimentary rocks7.4 Exploring metamorphic rocks7.5 Understanding the rock cycle 7.6 Describing stars and galaxies7.7 Explaining the effects of the Earth’s motion7.8 Exploring our neighbours in the Universe7.9 Using models in science Forces Year 7 topic1.1 Understanding Speed1.2 Describing journeys with distance-time graphs1.3 Exploring journeys on distance-time graphs1.4 Investigating the motion of a car on a ramp1.5 Understanding relative motion1.6 Understanding forces1.7 Understanding gravitational fields1.8 Understanding mass and weight1.9 Understanding gravity Genes Year 7 topic10.1 Looking at variation10.2 Exploring causes of variation10.3 Considering the importance of variation10.4 Understanding the female reproductive system and fertility10.5 Understanding the male reproductive system and fertilisation10.6 Learning how a foetus develops10.7 Understanding factors affecting a developing foetus10.8 Communicating ideas about smoking in pregnancy Reactions Year 7 topic6.1 Using metals and non-metals6.2 Exploring the reactions of metals with acids6.3 Understanding displacement reactions6.4 Understanding oxidation reactions6.2 Exploring the reactions of metals with acids6.5 Exploring acids6.6 Exploring alkalis6.7 Using indicators6.8 Exploring neutralisation6.9 Investigating neutralizationEcosystems Year 7 topic9.1 Understanding food webs9.2 Understanding the effects of toxins in the environment9.3 Exploring the importance of insects9.4 Exploring ecological balance9.5 Exploring flowering plants9.5 Exploring fertilisation9.7 Understanding how seeds are dispersed9.8 Understanding how fruits disperse seeds Energy Year 7 topic3.1 Understanding energy transfer by fuels and food3.2 Comparing rates of energy transfers3.3 Looking at the cost of energy use in the home3.4 Getting the electricity we need3.5 Using electricity responsibly3.6 Energy stores and transfers3.7 Exploring energy transfers3.8 Understanding potential energy and kinetic energy3.9 Understanding elastic energy Electromagnets Year 7 topic2.1 Describing electric circuits2.2 Understanding energy in circuits2.3 Explaining resistance2.4 Describing series and parallel circuits2.5 Comparing series and parallel circuits2.6 Investigating static charge2.7 Explaining static charge2.8 Understanding electric fields
SCHEMAS (Where might students learn about elements of this topic in other subjects? Which subjects might this topic feed into beyond your own?)Organisms – HAL (fitness, obesity, healthy lifestyle), Food technology (healthy diet), Health and Social Care GCSE (healthy lifestyle) Waves – Music (sound), Maths (Interpreting graphs, using equations) Matter – DT (materials) Earth – Geography (human impact, global warming) Forces – Maths (Interpreting graphs, using equations) Genes – Geography (biodiversity, extinction) Ecosystems – HAL (Respiration, fitness, exercise), Geography (transpiration) Energy – Maths (Interpreting graphs, using equations) Electromagnets – Geography (navigation)
CAREERS LINKS(How might this benefit them in the future?)Science enables students to make sense and question the world around them and develop an understanding of the ethical implications and social impact of scientific discoveries. By using creative thinking students can develop and challenge scientific models and theories. Science will equip students with the necessary skills to process data and make unbiased factual judgements. Example careers include: medicine, pharmacy, research, education and engineering.Science enables students to make sense and question the world around them and develop an understanding of the ethical implications and social impact of scientific discoveries. By using creative thinking students can develop and challenge scientific models and theories. Science will equip students with the necessary skills to process data and make unbiased factual judgements. Example careers include: medicine, pharmacy, research, education and engineering.Science enables students to make sense and question the world around them and develop an understanding of the ethical implications and social impact of scientific discoveries. By using creative thinking students can develop and challenge scientific models and theories. Science will equip students with the necessary skills to process data and make unbiased factual judgements. Example careers include: medicine, pharmacy, research, education and engineering.

Year 9
AutumnSpringSummer
TOPICSCellsAtomic StructureEnergy (taught on rotation)ElectricityOrganisationChemical changes (taught on rotation)MatterInfectionEnergy changesQuantitative ChemistryBonding (taught on rotation)
KNOWLEDGE TAUGHTCELLSUse the terms ‘eukaryotic’ and ‘prokaryotic’ to describe types of cellsDescribe the features of bacterial (prokaryotic) cellsDemonstrate an understanding of the scale and size of cells and be able to make order of magnitude calculations, inc standard formRecall the structures found in animal and plant (eukaryotic) cells inc algal cellsUse estimations and explain when they should be used to judge the relative size or area of sub-cellular structuresRequired practical 1: use a light microscope to observe, draw and label a selection of plant and animal cellsDescribe the functions of the structures in animal and plant (eukaryotic) cellsDescribe what a specialised cell is, including examples for plants and animalsDescribe what differentiation is, including differences between animals and plantsDefine the terms magnification and resolutionCompare electron and light microscopes in terms of their magnification and resolutionCarry out calculations involving magnification using the formula: magnification = size of image/ size of real object -inc standard formBio ONLY: Describe how bacteria reproduce and the conditions requiredBio ONLY: Describe how to prepare an uncontaminated cultureBio ONLY: Calculate cross-sectional areas of colonies or clear areas around colonies using πr²Bio ONLY: Calculate the number of bacteria in a population after a certain time if given the mean division timeBio & HT ONLY: Express answers for last two points in standard formRequired practical 2: investigate the effect of antiseptics or antibiotics on bacterial growth using agar plates and measuring zones of inhibitionDescribe how genetic information is stored in the nucleus of a cell (inc genes & chromosomes)Describe the processes that happen during the cell cycle, including mitosis (inc recognise and describe where mitosis occurs)Describe stem cells, including sources of stem cells in plants and animals and their rolesDescribe the use of stem cells in the production of plant clones and therapeutic cloningDiscuss the potential risks, benefits and issues with using stem cells in medical research/treatments (inc diabetes and paralysis)Describe the process of diffusion, including examplesExplain how diffusion is affected by different factors Define and explain “surface area to volume ratio”, and how this relates to single-celled and multicellular organisms (inc calculations)Explain how the effectiveness of an exchange surface can be increased, inc examples of adaptations for small intestines, lungs, gills roots & leavesDescribe the process of osmosis (inc calculation of water uptake & percentage gain and loss of mass of plant tissue)Required practical 3: investigate the effect of a range of concentrations of salt or sugar solutions on the mass of plant tissueDescribe the process of active transport, including examples – gut and rootsExplain the differences between diffusion, osmosis and active transport ATOMIC STRUCTUREState that everything is made of atoms and recall what they areDescribe what elements and compounds areState that elements and compounds are represented by symbols; and use chemical symbols and formulae to represent elements and compoundsWrite word equations and balanced symbol equations for chemical reactions, including using appropriate state symbolsHT ONLY: Write balanced half equations and ionic equationsDescribe what a mixture isName and describe the physical processes used to separate mixtures and suggest suitable separation techniquesDescribe how the atomic model has changed over time due to new experimental evidence, inc discovery of the atom and scattering experiments (inc the work of James Chadwick)Describe the difference between the plum pudding model of the atom and the nuclear model of the atomState the relative charge of protons, neutrons and electrons and describe the overall charge of an atomState the relative masses of protons, neutrons and electrons and describe the distribution of mass in an atomCalculate the number of protons, neutrons and electrons in an atom when given its atomic number and mass numberDescribe isotopes as atoms of the same element with different numbers of neutronsDefine the term relative atomic mass and why it takes into account the abundance of isotopes of the elementCalculate the relative atomic mass of an element given the percentage abundance of its isotopesDescribe how electrons fill energy levels in atoms, and represent the electron structure of elements using diagrams and numbersRecall how the elements in the periodic table are arrangedDescribe how elements with similar properties are placed in the periodic tableExplain why elements in the same group have similar properties and how to use the periodic table to predict the reactivity of elementsDescribe the early attempts to classify elementsExplain the creation and attributes of Mendeleev’s periodic tableIdentify metals and non-metals on the periodic table, compare and contrast their propertiesExplain how the atomic structure of metals and non-metals relates to their position in the periodic tableDescribe nobel gases (group 0) and explain their lack of reactivityDescribe the properties of noble gases, including boiling points, predict trends down the group and describe how their properties depend on the outer shell of electronsDescribe the reactivity and properties of group 1 alkali metals with reference to their electron arrangement and predict their reactionsDescribe the properties of group 7 halogens and how their properties relate to their electron arrangement, including trends in molecular mass, melting and boiling points and reactivityDescribe the reactions of group 7 halogens with metals and non-metalsChem ONLY: Describe the properties of transition metals and compare them with group 1 elements, including melting points and densities, strength and hardness, and reactivity (for CR, Mn Fe, Co, Ni & Cu) ENERGYDefine a system as an object or group of objects and state examples of changes in the way energy is stored in a systemDescribe how all the energy changes involved in an energy transfer and calculate relative changes in energy when the heat, work done or flow of charge in a system changesUse calculations to show on a common scale how energy in a system is redistributedCalculate the kinetic energy of an object by recalling and applying the equation: [ Ek = ½mv2 ]Calculate the amount of elastic potential energy stored in a stretched spring by applying, but not recalling, the equation: [ Ee= ½ke2 ]Calculate the amount of gravitational potential energy gained by an object raised above ground level by recalling and applying, the equation: [ Ee = mgh ]Calculate the amount of energy stored in or released from a system as its temperature changes by applying, but not recalling, the equation: [ ΔE = mcΔθ ]Define the term ‘specific heat capacity’Required practical 1: investigation to determine the specific heat capacity of one or more materials.Define power as the rate at which energy is transferred or the rate at which work is done and the watt as an energy transfer of 1 joule per secondCalculate power by recalling and applying the equations: [ P = E/t & P = W/t ]Explain, using examples, how two systems transferring the same amount of energy can differ in power output due to the time takenState that energy can be transferred usefully, stored or dissipated, but cannot be created or destroyed and so the total energy in a system does not changeExplain that only some of the energy in a system is usefully transferred, with the rest ‘wasted’, giving examples of how this wasted energy can be reducedExplain ways of reducing unwanted energy transfers and the relationship between thermal conductivity and energy transferredDescribe how the rate of cooling of a building is affected by the thickness and thermal conductivity of its wallsRequired practical 2: investigate the effectiveness of different materials as thermal insulators and the factors that may affect the thermal insulation properties of a material Calculate efficiency by recalling and applying the equation: [efficiency = useful power output / total power input].HT ONLY: Suggest and explain ways to increase the efficiency of an intended energy transferList the main renewable and non-renewable energy resources and define what a renewable energy resource isCompare ways that different energy resources are used, including uses in transport, electricity generation and heatingExplain why some energy resources are more reliable than others, explaining patterns and trends in their useEvaluate the use of different energy resources, taking into account any ethical and environmental issues which may ariseJustify the use of energy resources, with reference to both environmental issues and the limitations imposed by political, social, ethical or economic considerationsORGANISATIONDescribe the levels of organisation within living organismsDescribe the digestive system and how it works as an organ system (from KS3)Describe basic features of enzymes (inc rate calculations for chemical reactions)Describe the lock and key theory as a model of enzyme action and explain how the shape a of the active sites makes the enzyme specificExplain the effect of temperature and pH on enzymesDescribe the digestive enzymes, including their names, sites of production and actionsDescribe how the products of digestion are usedDescribe the features and functions of bile and state where it is produced and released fromRequired practical 4: use qualitative reagents to test for a range of carbohydrates, lipids and proteinsRequired practical 5: investigate the effect of pH on the rate of reaction of amylase enzymeDescribe the structure of the human heart and lungs (inc how lungs are adapted for gaseous exchange)Explain how the heart moves blood around the body (inc role and position of the aorta, vena cava, pulmonary artery & vein and coronary arteries)Explain how the natural resting heart rate is controlled and how irregularities can be correctedDescribe the structure and function of arteries, veins and capillariesUse simple compound measures such as rate and carry out rate calculations for blood flowDescribe blood and identify its different components, inc identifying blood cells from photographs/diagramsDescribe the functions of blood components, including adaptations to functionDescribe what happens in coronary heart disease and what statins are used forDescribe and evaluate treatments for coronary heart disease and heart failure (inc drugs, mechanical devices or transplant)Recall that heart valves can become faulty and describe the consequences of thisDescribe how patients can be treated in the case of heart failureDescribe health and the explain causes of ill-health and the relationship between health and diseaseDescribe how different types of diseases may interact and translate disease incidence informationbetween graphical and numerical formsDescribe what risk factors are and give examples discussing human and financial costs of non-communicable diseases at local, national and global levelsDescribe what cancer is and explain the difference between benign and malignant tumoursDescribe the known risk factors for cancer, including genetic and lifestyle risk factorsDescribe plant tissues (epidermal, palisade mesophyll, spongy mesophyll, xylem, phloem and meristem) and describe their functionsExplain how the structure of plant tissues are related to their function within the leaf (plant organ) inc stomata and guard cellsRecall the plant parts that form a plant organ system that transports substances around the plantExplain how root hair cells, xylem and phloem are adapted to their functionsDescribe the process of transpiration and translocation including the role of the different plant tissuesExplain how the rate of transpiration can be affected by different factors (inc naming the factors)Describe the role of stomata and guard cells in the control of gas exchange and water loss  CHEMICAL CHANGESDescribe how metals react with oxygen and state the compound they form, define oxidation and reductionDescribe the arrangement of metals in the reactivity series, including carbon and hydrogen, and use the reactivity series to predict the outcome of displacement reactionsRecall and describe the reactions, if any, of potassium, sodium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron and copper with water or dilute acidsRelate the reactivity of metals to its tendency to form positive ions and be able to deduce an order of reactivity of metals based on experimental resultsRecall what native metals are and explain how metals can be extracted from the compounds in which they are found in nature by reduction with carbonEvaluate specific metal extraction processes when given appropriate information and identify which species are oxidised or reducedHT ONLY: Describe oxidation and reduction in terms of loss and gain of electronsHT ONLY: Write ionic equations for displacement reactions, and identify which species are oxidised and reduced from a symbol or half equationHT ONLY: Explain in terms of gain or loss of electrons that the reactions between acids and some metals are redox reactions, and identify which species are oxidised and which are reduced (Mg, Zn, Fe + HCl & H2SO4)Explain that acids can be neutralised by alkalis, bases and metal carbonates and list the products of each of these reactionsPredict the salt produced in a neutralisation reaction based on the acid used and the positive ions in the base, alkali or carbonate and use the formulae of common ions to deduce the formulae of the saltDescribe how soluble salts can be made from acids and how pure, dry samples of salts can be obtainedRequired practical 1: preparation of a pure, dry sample of a soluble salt from an insoluble oxide or carbonate using a Bunsen burner to heat dilute acid and a water bath or electric heater to evaporate the solutionRecall what the pH scale measures and describe the scale used to identify acidic, neutral or alkaline solutionsDefine the terms acid and alkali in terms of production of hydrogen ions or hydroxide ions (in solution), define the term baseDescribe the use of universal indicator to measure the approximate pH of a solution and use the pH scale to identify acidic or alkaline solutionsChem ONLY: Describe how to carry out titrations using strong acids and strong alkalis only (sulfuric, hydrochloric and nitric acids to find the reacting volumes accuratelyChem & HT ONLY: Calculate the chemical quantities in titrations involving concentrations in mol/dm3 and in g/dm3Chem ONLY: Required practical 2: determination of the reacting volumes of solutions of a strong acid and a strong alkali by titrationHT ONLY: Use and explain the terms dilute and concentrated (in terms of amount of substance) and weak and strong (in terms of the degree of ionisation) in relation to acidsHT ONLY: Explain how the concentration of an aqueous solution and the strength of an acid affects the pH of the solution and how pH is related to the hydrogen ion concentration of a solutionDescribe how ionic compounds can conduct electricity when dissolved in water and describe these solutions as electrolytesDescribe the process of electrolysisDescribe the electrolysis of molten ionic compounds and predict the products at each electrode of the electrolysis of binary ionic compoundsExplain how metals are extracted from molten compounds using electrolysis and use the reactivity series to explain why some metals are extracted with electrolysis instead of carbonDescribe the electrolysis of aqueous solutions and predict the products of the electrolysis of aqueous solutions containing single ionic compoundsRequired practical 3: investigate what happens when aqueous solutions are electrolysed using inert electrodesHT ONLY: Describe the reactions at the electrodes during electrolysis as oxidation and reduction reactions and write balanced half equations for these reactions ELECTRICITYDraw and interpret circuit diagrams, including all common circuit symbolsDefine electric current as the rate of flow of electrical charge around a closed circuitCalculate charge and current by recalling and applying the formula: [ Q = It ]Explain that current is caused by a source of potential difference and it has the same value at any point in a single closed loop of a circuitDescribe and apply the idea that the greater the resistance of a component, the smaller the current for a given potential difference (p.d.) across the componentCalculate current, potential difference or resistance by recalling and applying the equation: [ V = IR ]Required practical 3: Use circuit diagrams to set up and check circuits to investigate the factors affecting the resistance of electrical circuitsDefine an ohmic conductorExplain the resistance of components such as lamps, diodes, thermistors and LDRs and sketch/interpret IV graphs of their characteristic electrical behaviourExplain how to measure the resistance of a component by drawing an appropriate circuit diagram using correct circuit symbolsRequired practical 4: use circuit diagrams to construct appropriate circuits to investigate the I–V characteristics of a variety of circuit elementsShow by calculation and explanation that components in series have the same current passing through them Show by calculation and explanation that components connected in parallel have the same the potential difference across each of them Calculate the total resistance of two components in series as the sum of the resistance of each component using the equation: [ R total = R1 + R2 ] Explain qualitatively why adding resistors in series increases the total resistance whilst adding resistors in parallel decreases the total resistance Solve problems for circuits which include resistors in series using the concept of equivalent resistance Explain the difference between direct and alternating voltage and current, stating what UK mains is Identify and describe the function of each wire in a three-core cable connected to the mainState that the potential difference between the live wire and earth (0 V) is about 230V and that both neutral wires and our bodies are at, or close to, earth potential (0 V)Explain that a live wire may be dangerous even when a switch in the mains circuit is open by explaining the danger of providing any connection between the live wire and earthExplain how the power transfer in any circuit device is related to the potential difference across it and the current through itCalculate power by recalling and applying the equations: [ P = VI ] and [ P = I2 R ]Describe how appliances transfer energy to the kinetic energy of motors or the thermal energy of heating devicesCalculate and explain the amount of energy transferred by electrical work by recalling and applying the equations: [ E = Pt ] and [ E = QV ]Explain how the power of a circuit device is related to the potential difference across it, the current through it and the energy transferred over a given time.Describe, with examples, the relationship between the power ratings for domestic electrical appliances and the changes in stored energy when they are in useIdentify the National Grid as a system of cables and transformers linking power stations to consumersExplain why the National Grid system is an efficient way to transfer energy, with reference to change in potential difference reducing currentPHY ONLY: Describe the production of static electricity by the rubbing of insulating surfacesPHY ONLY: Describe evidence that charged objects exert forces of attraction or repulsion on one another when not in contactPHY ONLY: Explain how the transfer of electrons between objects can explain thephenomenon of static electricity, including how insulators are charged and sparks are createdPHY ONLY: Draw the electric field pattern for an isolated charged spherePHY ONLY: Explain the concept of an electric field and the decrease in its strength as the distance from it increasesPHY ONLY: Explain how the concept of an electric field helps to Explain the non-contact force between charged objects as well as other electrostatic phenomena such as sparkingMATTERCalculate the density of a material by recalling and applying the equation: [ ρ = m/V ]Recognise/draw simple diagrams to model the difference between solids, liquids and gasesUse the particle model to explain the properties of different states of matter and differences in the density of materialsRequired practical 5: use appropriate apparatus to make and record the measurements needed to determine the densities of regular and irregular solid objects and liquidsRecall and describe the names of the processes by which substances change stateUse the particle model to explain why a change of state is reversible and affects the properties of a substance, but not its massState that the internal energy of a system is stored in the atoms and molecules that make up the systemExplain that internal energy is the total kinetic energy and potential energy of all the particles in a systemCalculate the change in thermal energy by applying but not recalling the equation [ΔE =m c Δθ ]Calculate the specific latent heat of fusion/vaporisation by applying, but not recalling, the equation: [ E = mL ]Interpret and draw heating and cooling graphs that include changes of stateDistinguish between specific heat capacity and specific latent heatExplain why the molecules of a gas are in constant random motion and that the higher the temperature of a gas, the greater the particles’ average kinetic energyExplain, with reference to the particle model, the effect of changing the temperature of a gas held at constant volume on its pressureCalculate the change in the pressure of a gas or the volume of a gas (a fixed mass held at constant temperature) when either the pressure or volume is increased or decreasedPHY ONLY: Explain, with reference to the particle model, how increasing the volume in which a gas is contained can lead to a decrease in pressure when the temperature is constantPHY ONLY: Calculate the pressure for a fixed mass of gas held at a constant temperature by applying, but not recalling, the equation: [ pV = constant ]PHY & HT ONLY: Explain how work done on an enclosed gas can lead to an increase in the temperature of the gas, as in a bicycle pump INFECTIONExplain what a pathogen is and how pathogens are spread (inc how viruses, bacteria, protists and fungi are spread in animals and plants)Explain how pathogenic bacteria and viruses cause damage in the bodyExplain how the spread of diseases can be reduced or preventedDescribe measles, HIV and tobacco mosaic virus as examples of viral pathogensDescribe salmonella food poisoning and gonorrhoea as examples of bacterial pathogensDescribe the signs, transmission and treatment of rose black spot infection in plants as an example of fungal pathogensDescribe the symptoms, transmission and control of malaria, including knowledge of the mosquito vector as an example of a protists pathogenDescribe defences that stop pathogens entering the human body (inc skin, nose, trachea & windpipe, stomach)Recall the role of the immune systemDescribe how white blood cells destroy pathogensDescribe how vaccination works, including at the population levelExplain how antibiotics and painkillers are used to treat diseases, including their limitationsDescribe how sources for drugs have changed over time and give some examplesDescribe how new drugs are tested, including pre-clinical testing and clinical trials (inc double blind trials and placebos)Bio & HT ONLY: Describe what monoclonal antibodies are and why they are usefulBio & HT ONLY: Describe how monoclonal antibodies are producedBio & HT ONLY: Explain how monoclonal antibodies are used for diagnosis, research, chemical testing and disease treatmentsBio & HT ONLY: Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of monoclonal antibodies (inc side effects)Bio & HT ONLY: Describe some observable signs of plant disease, and how plant diseases can be identifiedBio ONLY: Give examples of plant pathogensBio ONLY: Give examples of plant ion deficiencies and their effectsBio ONLY: Describe physical, chemical and mechanical defence responses of plants ENERGY CHANGESDescribe how energy is transferred to or from the surroundings during a chemical reactionExplain exothermic and endothermic reactions on the basis of the temperature change of the surroundings and give examples of everyday usesRequired practical 4: investigate the variables that affect temperature changes in reacting solutionsDescribe what the collision theory is and define the term activation energyInterpret and draw reaction profiles of exothermic and endothermic reactions, inc identifying the relative energies of reactants and products, activation energy and overall energy changeHT ONLY: Explain the energy changes in breaking and making bonds and calculate the overall energy change using bond energiesChem ONLY: Describe what a simple cell and a battery is and how they produce electricityChem ONLY: Describe why alkaline batteries are non-rechargeable, state why some cells are rechargeable and evaluate the use of cellsChem ONLY: Describe fuel cells and compare fuel cells to rechargeable cells and batteriesChem ONLY: Describe the overall reaction in a hydrogen fuel cellChem & HT ONLY: Write half equations for the electrode reactions in a hydrogen fuel cell BONDINGDescribe the three main types of bonds: ionic bonds, covalent bonds and metallic bonds in terms of electrostatic forces and the transfer or sharing of electronsDescribe how the ions produced by elements in some groups have the electronic structure of a noble gas and explain how the charge of an ion relates to its group numberDescribe the structure of ionic compounds, including the electrostatic forces of attraction, and represent ionic compounds using dot and cross diagramsDescribe the limitations of using dot and cross, ball and stick, two and three-dimensional diagrams to represent a giant ionic structureWork out the empirical formula of an ionic compound from a given model or diagram that shows the ions in the structureDescribe covalent bonds and identify different types of covalently bonded substances, such as small molecules, large molecules and substances with giant covalent structuresRepresent covalent bonds between small molecules, repeating units of polymers and parts of giant covalent structures using diagramsDraw dot and cross diagrams for the molecules of hydrogen, chlorine, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen chloride, water, ammonia and methaneDeduce the molecular formula of a substance from a given model or diagram in these forms showing the atoms and bonds in the moleculeDescribe the arrangement of atoms and electrons in metallic bonds and draw diagrams the bonding in metalsName the three States of matter, identify them from a simple model and state which changes of state happen at melting and boiling pointsExplain changes of state using particle theory and describe factors that affect the melting and boiling point of a substanceHT ONLY: Discuss the limitations of particle theoryRecall what (s), (l), (g) and (aq) mean when used in chemical equations and be able to use them appropriatelyExplain how the structure of ionic compounds affects their properties, including melting and boiling points and conduction of electricity (sodium chloride structure only)Explain how the structure of small molecules affects their propertiesExplain how the structure of polymers affects their propertiesExplain how the structure of giant covalent structures affects their propertiesExplain how the structure of metals and alloys affects their properties, including explaining why they are good conductorsExplain why alloys are harder than pure metals in terms of the layers of atomsExplain the properties of graphite, diamond and graphene in terms of their structure and bondingDescribe the structure of fullerenes, and their uses, including Buckminsterfullerene and carbon nanotubesChem ONLY: Compare the dimensions of nanoparticles to other particles and explain the effect of their surface area to volume ratio on their propertiesChem ONLY: Discuss the applications of nanoparticles and their advantages and disadvantages, including uses in medicine, cosmetics, fabrics and the development of catalysts QUANTITATIVE CHEMISTRYState that mass is conserved and explain why, including describing balanced equations in terms of conservation of massExplain the use of the multipliers in equations in normal script before a formula and in subscript within a formulaDescribe what the relative formula mass (Mr) of a compound is and calculate the relative formula mass of a compound, given its formulaCalculate the relative formula masses of reactants and products to prove that mass is conserved in a balanced chemical equationExplain observed changes of mass during chemical reactions in non-enclosed systems using the particle model when given the balanced symbol equationExplain why whenever a measurement is made there is always some uncertainty about the result obtainedHT ONLY: State that chemical amounts are measured in moles (mol) and explain what a mol is with reference to relative formula mass and Avogadro’s constantHT ONLY: Use the relative formula mass of a substance to calculate the number of moles in a given mass of the substanceHT ONLY: Calculate the masses of reactants and products when given a balanced symbol equationHT ONLY: Use moles to write a balanced equation when given the masses of reactants and products (inc changing the subject of the equation)HT ONLY: Explain the effect of limiting the quantity of a reactant on the amount of products in terms of moles or masses in gramsCalculate the mass of solute in a given volume of solution of known concentration in terms of mass per given volume of solutionHT ONLY: Explain how the mass of a solute and the volume of a solution is related to the concentration of the solutionChem ONLY: Explain why it is not always possible to obtain the calculated or expected amount of a productChem ONLY: Calculate the theoretical amount of a product and percentage yield of a product using the formula % yield = mass of product made/max theoretical mass of product x 100Chem & HT ONLY: Calculate the theoretical mass of a product from a given mass of reactant and the balanced equation for the reactionChem ONLY: Describe atom economy as a measure of the amount of reactants that end up as useful productsChem ONLY: Calculate the percentage atom economy of a reaction to form a desired product using the equation % atom economy =RfM of desired product/sum of RfM of all reactants x 100Chem & HT ONLY: Explain why a particular reaction pathway is chosen to produce a specified product, given appropriate data Chem & HT ONLY: Calculate the amount of solute (in moles or grams) in a solution from its concentration in mol/dm3Chem & HT ONLY: Calculate the concentration of a solution when it reacts completely with another solution of a known concentration Chem & HT ONLY: Describe how to carry out titrations of strong acids and strong alkalis and calculate quantities in titrations involving concentrations in mol/dm3 and g/dm3 Chem & HT ONLY: Explain how the concentration of a solution in mol/dm3 is related to the mass of the solute and the volume of the solution Chem & HT ONLY: Explain what the volume of one mole of any gas at room temperature is Chem & HT ONLY: Calculate the volume of a gas at room temperature and pressure from its mass and relative formula mass
SKILLS DEVELOPED(Include any trips and visits.)Working Scientifically1. Understand how scientific methods and theories develop over time.2. Use a variety of models such as representational, spatial, descriptive, computational and mathematical to solve problems, make predictions and to develop scientific explanations and understanding of familiar and unfamiliar facts.3. Use scientific theories and explanations to develop hypotheses.4. Plan experiments or devise procedures to make observations, produce or characterise a substance, test hypotheses, check data or explore phenomena.5. Apply a knowledge of a range of techniques, instruments, apparatus, and materials to select those appropriate to the experiment.6. Carry out experiments appropriately having due regard for the correct manipulation of apparatus, the accuracy of measurements and health and safety considerations.6. Make and record observations and measurements using a range of apparatus and methods. Read measurements off a scale in a practical context and record appropriately. 7. Evaluate methods and suggest possible improvements and further investigations.8. Presenting observations and other data using appropriate methods.9. Translating data from one form to another.10. Carrying out and represent mathematical and statistical analysis.11. Being objective, evaluating data in terms of accuracy, precision, repeatability and reproducibility and identifying potential sources of random and systematic error.
ASSESSMENTS(Minimum two per half term, with focussed marking.)Cells mini testAtomic structure mini testEnergy mini testTrust assessmentElectricity mini testOrganisation mini testChemical changes mini testMatter mini testInfection and response mini testEnergy changes mini testQuantitative Chemistry mini testBonding mini test
HOME LEARNING(To be made available via Century Tech; one per week.)GCSE PODExam questions/past papersGCSE PODExam questions/past papersGCSE PODExam questions/past papers
SEQUENCING (What must students already have been taught in order to begin to learn this topic? Identify opportunities to address knowledge gaps)Organisms Year 7 – Cells 8.5 Understanding organisation of organisms8.6 Describing animal and plant cells8.7 Understanding adaptations of cells8.8 Exploring cells8.9 Understanding unicellular organisms Matter Year 7 – Particle Model5.1 Using particles to explain matter5.2 Understanding solids5.3 Understanding liquids and gases5.4 Exploring diffusion5.5 Explaining changes of state Matter Year 8 5.1  Looking at the Periodic Table of elements5.2 Exploring metals in the periodic table5.3 Exploring non-metals in the periodic table5.4 Analysing wider patterns within the periodic table5.5 Combining elements5.6 Comparing elements and compounds5.7 Exploring polymers5.8 Exploring ceramics and composites Energy Year 7 3.1 Understanding energy transfer by fuels and food3.2 Comparing rates of energy transfers3.3 Looking at the cost of energy use in the home3.4 Getting the electricity we need3.5 Using electricity responsibly3.6 Energy stores and transfers3.7 Exploring energy transfers3.8 Understanding potential energy and kinetic energy3.9 Understanding elastic energy Energy Year 8 – Work and Heating/Cooling3.1 Doing work3.2 Making work easier3.3 Explaining thermal energy3.4 Heating3.5 How to stop energy from travelling3.6 Energy and temperatureOrganisation Year 8 8.1 Understanding how we breathe8.2 Measuring breathing8.3 Explaining gas exchange in humans8.4 Exploring the effects of disease and lifestyle8.5 Exploring a healthy diet8.6 Understanding the effects of an unbalanced diet8.7 Understanding the human digestive system8.8 Understanding the roles of the digestive organs Reactions Year 7 6.1 Using metals and non-metals6.2 Exploring the reactions of metals with acids6.3 Understanding displacement reactions6.4 Understanding oxidation reactions6.5 Exploring acids6.6 Exploring alkalis6.7 Using indicators6.8 Exploring neutralisation6.9 Investigating neutralization Matter Year 7 – Separating mixtures5.6 Separating mixtures5.7 Exploring solutions5.8 Understanding distillation5.9 Exploring chromatography Electromagnets Year 7 2.1 Describing electric circuits2.2 Understanding energy in circuits2.3 Explaining resistance2.4 Describing series and parallel circuits2.5 Comparing series and parallel circuits2.3 Explaining resistance2.4 Describing series and parallel circuits2.5 Comparing series and parallel circuits2.6 Investigating static charge2.7 Explaining static charge2.8 Understanding electric fields Matter Year 8 – Periodic table and Elements5.1  Looking at the Periodic Table of elements5.2 Exploring metals in the periodic table5.3 Exploring non-metals in the periodic table5.4 Analysing wider patterns within the periodic table5.5 Combining elements5.6 Comparing elements and compounds5.7 Exploring polymers5.8 Exploring ceramics and composites Organisation Year 8 – Digestion 8.4 Exploring the effects of disease and lifestyle8.5 Exploring a healthy diet Ecosystems Year 8 – Photosynthesis 9.9 Investigating the importance of minerals to plants Reactions Yr86.1 Understanding exothermic reactions6.2 Comparing endothermic and exothermic changes6.3 Investigating endothermic reactions6.4 Explaining the use of catalysts6.5 Exploring combustion6.6 Exploring the use of fuels6.7 Understanding thermal decomposition6.8 Explaining changes 
SCHEMAS (Where might students learn about elements of this topic in other subjects? Which subjects might this topic feed into beyond your own?)Cells – Maths (scale and magnification, using equations)Atomic Structure – Maths (balancing equations), DT (properties of metals and non-metals)  Energy – Maths (interpreting graphs, using equations), Geography (renewable and sustainable energy sources)Electricity – Maths (interpreting graphs, using equations) Organisation – HAL (fitness, obesity, healthy lifestyle), Food technology (healthy diet), Health and Social Care GCSE (healthy lifestyle)Chemical changes – Maths (ratios, using equations)Matter – DT (density)Infection and response – Health and Social Care GCSE (disease)Energy changes – Maths (interpreting graphs, using equations)Quantitative Chemistry  – Maths (ratios, using equations) Bonding  – DT (materials, nanotechnology)
CAREERS LINKS(How might this benefit them in the future?)Science enables students to make sense and question the world around them and develop an understanding of the ethical implications and social impact of scientific discoveries. By using creative thinking students can develop and challenge scientific models and theories. Science will equip students with the necessary skills to process data and make unbiased factual judgements. Example careers include: medicine, pharmacy, research, education and engineering.Science enables students to make sense and question the world around them and develop an understanding of the ethical implications and social impact of scientific discoveries. By using creative thinking students can develop and challenge scientific models and theories. Science will equip students with the necessary skills to process data and make unbiased factual judgements. Example careers include: medicine, pharmacy, research, education and engineering.Science enables students to make sense and question the world around them and develop an understanding of the ethical implications and social impact of scientific discoveries. By using creative thinking students can develop and challenge scientific models and theories. Science will equip students with the necessary skills to process data and make unbiased factual judgements. Example careers include: medicine, pharmacy, research, education and engineering.