ADD SOME TEXT THROUGH CUSTOMIZER

History Curriculum

Statement

Subject Intent Statement:

Every student should be guaranteed an entitlement to History that generates a passion for people and develops an understanding of human issues that resonate today. Chronological, geographical and thematic diversity should be an entitlement at each stage of the History curriculum. We want our students to make a deep and meaningful connection with the past, be highly tuned critical thinkers and be creative.

 

Students should have the opportunity to learn about local History and to also see the place of Britain in European and world History. They should have a broad understanding of key historical ideas and themes that will allow them to access the world we live in today.

Termly Overview

I am text block. Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Year 7 Aut 1 Aut 2 Spr 1 Spr 2 Sum 1 Sum 2
TOPIC Early migration and conquest of Britain How did life change under the Normans and how the power of the king was challenged in the Middle Ages The expansion of Islam and the consequences of the Crusades Life of a peasant in Medieval England and the Peasants Revolt War of the Roses and the diminishing power of the Catholic church England’s experience of the Reformation and were people better off in the Tudor period than the Middle Ages?
KNOWLEDGE TAUGHT -Why did the Romans invade and what was life like under the Romans-Why did the Anglo Saxons invade and what was life like under the Anglo Saxons-Why did the Vikings invade and what was life like under the Vikings -The death of Edward the Confessor and claimants to the throne-Battle of Stamford Bridge -How William won the Battle of Hastings-How the Normans controlled England-The power of the church and king in Medieval England-Magna Carta -Expansion of Islam from the 6thCentury-Was Umayyad Spain a great example of religious tolerance?- How similar is Umayyad Spain to the influence early migratory groups had on Britain?-The Crusades-Importance of the Holy Land and consequences of the Crusades -The life of a Medieval peasant-The development of trade in Europe and the Middle East-The Black Death-The Peasants Revolt- Who had the most power in Medieval Britain? -The War of the Roses- The legitimacy of Richard III or Henry VII for the throne- Was a Tudor King more powerful than a Norman King? Looking at the setup of Tudor government- e.g Privy Council-Differences between Catholics and Protestants- Reformation-Henry VIII -Why Henry VIII broke from Rome-The experience of an ordinary British person during the Reformation-Differences between Mary and Elizabeth-Were people better off in the Tudor period than the Middle Ages-Growth of the gentry
SKILLS DEVELOPED(Include any trips and visits.) Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Possible trip to Blakesley Hall
ASSESSMENTS(Minimum one per half term, with focussed marking as per our department marking policy  ‘The different early migratory groups had a positive impact on Britain.’ Do you agree? ‘The King was in complete control of Medieval Britain’. How far do you agree? Explain the most important reason for why people in Europe went on Crusades?   Knowledge Check on everything covered so far Trust Summative Assessment Compare and contrast the rule of Henry VIII with the rule of William the Conqueror
HOME LEARNING Research an example left behind by the early invaders in the local area, e.g, Metchley Roman fort in Birmingham  Find a modern day example of an event/famous person who people have different interpretations of and explain why people have these different interpretations, e.g, the Queen/Prime Minister Research into any religious wars taking place today- write a paragraph on the religions involved and the impact of these wars, e.g, Iraq, Syria, India Research on other deadly diseases and their impact, e.g, Spanish Flu, coronavirus, etc Come up with 10 facts about Henry VIII- to be given at the start of the half term ready to support students with the final lesson on Henry VIII Students write a paragraph to answer the question; ‘What is the point of the Royal Family’
SEQUENCING (What must students already have been taught in order to begin to learn this topic? Identify opportunities to address knowledge gaps) Some work done in primary schools around early settlers to Britain Early invasion links to the Norman invasion and the brutal rule of the Normans- links here to Roman Britain and other early invaders Different religions living in one country- already discussed in the first unit where Christendom over took Paganism in Britain Links to power in unit two- did the king have full control? Were people’s lives any better in the Middle Ages than in Norman Britain- use of violence to ensure order- Harrying of the North and the Peasants Revolt Links to early government- comparisons made between the Magna Carta and the Tudor Privy Council. Problems with religious difference already discussed in unit 2- this time a focus on Catholics and Protestants Comparing all units to see if people were any better off in the Tudor period compared to early invasions, Norman England and Medieval England
SCHEMAS (Where might students learn about elements of this topic in other subjects? Which subjects might this topic feed into beyond your own?) English- they look at texts from the Ancient world- Greek and Roman Aspire RE RE/ Aspire RE RE
CAREERS LINKS(How might this benefit them in the future?)     Religious tolerance and looking at how tolerant we are of other cultures in Britain today     Historical enquiries- being able to use evidence to reach judgements- careers such as law, politics and police
Year 8 Aut 1 Aut 2 Spr 1 Spr 2 Sum 1 Sum 2
TOPIC Successes and failures at home and abroad- early colonisation and the English Civil War The Restoration, Glorious Revolution and creation of the United Kingdom The cost of industrialisation How Britain ruled the waves?   Fight for the vote-how far had British politics changed from 1500-1900? Were people living better lives in 1900 than they were in the 1500s?
KNOWLEDGE TAUGHT -Exploration and colonisation in the 16thand 17th Century-Jamestown colony and key people (Pocahontas/Powhatan tribe and John Smith)- Causes of the English Civil War – the difference between Parliamentarians and Royalists- What type of warfare and weapons were used and the key battles of the Civil War- Impact of the Civil War and the end of the monarchy- The Protectorate – Look at a Parliamentarian interpretation of Oliver Cromwell Vs. an Irish Interpretation – Charles II returns to England, what is his relationship with Parliament- Why did Charles offer sanctuary to the Huguenots?- How did James II cause a Glorious Revolution?-New medical ideas- Renaissance (Harvey, Pare, Vesalius) similarities and differences with treatments of the Black Death and Great Plague- How did the Parliaments of England and Scotland unite? Act of Union 1707 -Origins of the Mughal Empire and the Industrial output of Mughal India-Why did the Mughal Empire in India end? (East India Company)- How did the French social structure trigger a Revolution?-Links to Glorious Revolution/Civil War – the idea that the elite are oppressive- The Industrial Revolution in Britain-Living and working conditions for the ordinary worker compared to the lives of the industrialists -Reasons for building an Empire-How the Empire grew through slavery- How did the British take control of India (links to trade routes/exploration)-The movement of people around the Empire-make links back to Jamestown/exploration and early colonisation/ religious strife (Puritans)- The difference between forced migration and voluntary migration -Why did people challenge the system of elitism in Britain (Peterloo Massacre and Chartists) possibly two lessons-Why did people ignore the voice of women?- The Suffragettes-At what point did the people truly have a voice?  Decline of the monarchy and the rise of Parliament -Living in a Tudor market town (health and conditions)-Living in a 17th Century town (health and conditions)-Living in a town during the Industrial Revolution (health and conditions)- What rights did people have- comparison with 1500s, 1700s and 1900s-Was it better to live in a village or the city in 1900? 
SKILLS DEVELOPED(Include any trips and visits.) Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, EnqPossible trip to the Birmingham back to backs
ASSESSMENTS(Minimum one per half term, with focussed marking as per our department policy) How do the Interpretations differ about Oliver Cromwell’s leadership? “Parliament held most of the power in the 17thCentury”.  How far do you agree with this statement? Knowledge Check on everything covered so far “The British Empire was built on the suffering of others”.  How far do you agree with this statement? Trust Summative Assessment Were people living better lives in 1900 than they were in the 1500s? 
HOME LEARNING(To be made available via Century Tech; one per week.) Produce a learning poster/leaflet for a primary school pupil on the things England brought back following colonisation- they could also include anything brought back in the Crusades too Research into the Scottish and Welsh National Parties and their aims Diary entry of a child factory worker during the Industrial Revolution Research task where students have to list countries in the British Empire and what we got from them, e.g, tea, silk and spices from India Design a Suffragette/Chartist poster campaigning for the vote Research task on Birmingham’s involvement in the Industrial Revolution 
SEQUENCING (What must students already have been taught in order to begin to learn this topic? Identify opportunities to address knowledge gaps) Links to yr 7- the age of exploration under Elizabeth. The issues when two different cultures clash. Links to democracy and the power of government- how was the power of the king taken away all together- links back to Magna Carta and Peasants Revolt Importance of the monarchy. Links to early migration- this time looking at the Huguenots and coming to England to flee religious persecution in France. The shaping of Britain with the acts of Union. The growth of the power of parliament and the beginnings of political democracy- link back to ideas of democracy in yr 7. Issues between Protestants and Catholics looked at the end of yr 7 Looking at the idea of a golden age or age of empire but looking at it from the view of India to make it more relevant to our students. Power and how it was challenged- links back to previous units and how the people brought about a revolution in France to topple the monarchy- some links to the Peasants Revolt. Links to previous units on migration and religious/cultural differences. The shaping of Britain into a world superpower- links to today- Britain’s place in the world now- Brexit Previous links to ideas about democracy and people standing up to the ruling classes. Continued decline of the monarchy and power of parliament Links to previous units- how has the life of a British person improved- are people better off in the 19thCentury compared to Tudor times
SCHEMAS (Where might students learn about elements of this topic in other subjects? Which subjects might this topic feed into beyond your own?) RE RE/ Aspire English Geography/ RE Aspire Geography and English- links with the books they read
CAREERS LINKS(How might this benefit them in the future?)   Looking at modern Britain today and the term refugee which was first used when the Huguenots came to England. Devolution of Scotland- politics   Law/government- the ongoing consequences of the British Empire, e.g, the Commonwealth To be able to make a decision on how representative Britain was in the 19th Century- are we fully representative today? Having an overview on how the life of a British person has changed over 400 years
Year 9 Aut 1 Aut 2 Spr 1 Spr 2 Sum 1 Sum 2
TOPIC Why did the world go to war in 1914 and how this led to the mass killing of Jews?  -For whom was Russia a communist utopia?-The welfare state in Britain- how did people’s lives improve?(COMPARISON STUDY)  Why did the world go to war again in 1939?and have the causes of conflicts changed, 1000-2020? Local study- the impact of both world wars on Birmingham? How have different migratory groups changed Britain- 43-2020?  I have left this half term blank as the curriculum may overrun and there is a possibility that if we move to 4 lessons a fortnight for GCSE, we can start the GCSEs in yr 9
KNOWLEDGE TAUGHT -Main causes of World War One-Key battles of WW1 and the experience of the soldier- Main consequences of WW1-How Hitler used propaganda, personal charisma, the Great Depression and weaknesses of the Weimar to gain public support-The history of anti-Semitism and making comparisons between medieval and 20th Century anti-Semitism and the implementation of the Nuremberg Laws-Kristallnacht and The Final Solution -Lenin and Stalin- what were their aims?-How did Communism work?  Who supported it and why?-Did anyone benefit from Communism?-Why did the government start intervening in the lives of the people? (links to the vote from year 8)-What were the Liberal Reforms and how far did they help people?-How did the NHS improve the lives of Britain’s poor? – Causes of WW2-Major battles in WW2- Impact on the wider world and Britain- Spread of nationalism and the end of the British empire- Have the causes of conflicts changed much- comparing key conflicts throughout History – Guided research project on the impact of both world wars on Birmingham- How did the people of Birmingham contribute- Looking at soldiers from Birmingham in both wars- How did life change for the people of Birmingham after both world wars – Wind Rush Generation- migration from the British Empire- what impact have those people from India, Pakistan, Caribbean and Africa had on British society? -Looking at different migratory groups and their impact on British society today- particularly from eastern Europe- Looking at events across the world and Britain to see how we still try to stand up against government on issues, e.g, climate change, recent events in Hong Kong  
SKILLS DEVELOPED(Include any trips and visits.) Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq Cau and Con, Cha and Cont, Evi, Int, Sig, Per, Enq  
ASSESSMENTS(Minimum one per half term, with focussed marking as per our department policy.) Explain the most important reason why the Nazis became so popular Cartoon analysis- different interpretations of the creation of the NHS Trust Summative Assessment Group research project How have different migratory groups changed Britain- 43-2020?  
HOME LEARNING(To be made available via Century Tech; one per week.) Write a diary entry from the perspective of a Jewish child living in Nazi Germany  Research task into different Communist countries today and how successful they are, e.g, Cuba, North Korea  Letter from a child evacuee during WW2 Research for in class project Students to complete a family history interview with someone in their family to find out more about where their ancestors came from   
SEQUENCING (What must students already have been taught in order to begin to learn this topic? Identify opportunities to address knowledge gaps) Religious persecution in previous units. Links to the empire and growing power of Britain and how this caused tensions in Europe The power of government to make changes and improvements to the life of an ordinary British person Links to causes of WW1 and other world conflicts. Religious tensions previously discussed, e.g, the partition of India and Pakistan Previous work on both world wars Previous links to migration, e.g, early invaders, Huguenots. Previous clashes between religion and culture  
SCHEMAS (Where might students learn about elements of this topic in other subjects? Which subjects might this topic feed into beyond your own?) Music/ Drama- they look at WW1 English- I know they study Animal Farm  Music/ Drama English RE/ Geography  
CAREERS LINKS(How might this benefit them in the future?) International affairs/ government Any career in local government and politics- looking at state intervention Army Opportunity to talk to people, research, community links Social work, Health care profession, international affairs  

Good historians can and will do the following to make sense of the past- these skills underpin the whole KS3 curriculum:

  • Good historians explain why things happen (Cau and Con) 

They can show how events have many causes and how these causes link

together. They see that some causes are more important than others

  • Good historians understand how things changed or stayed the same (Cha and Cont) 

They understand that things in the past developed and changed over time. They

understand that sometimes things stayed the same while other things developed rapidly.

They can talk about turning points in history, and judge the pace and amount of change.

  • Good historians are skilful at using evidence (Evi)

They can use evidence to make suggestions about what the past was like. They

can compare different sources and decide on the most useful ones to find out

about a topic. They are also careful to think about how reliable evidence is.

  • Good historians think about interpretations of the past (Int)

They examine historians’ interpretations carefully. They think hard about why

people interpreting the past have made particular claims and about the kind

of evidence on which they were based. They think about the context in which

historical interpretations were created and how this affects them.

  • Good historians understand historical significance (Sig)

They can explain the significance of events by looking at the changes that

resulted from them. They are able to select and justify criteria for making

judgements about significance.

  • Good historians understand historical perspectives (Per)

They understand that people in the past had very different ideas about the world

than people today. They think about the time in which people lived and how this

affected them.

  • Good historians can conduct historical enquiries (Enq)

They know how to ask questions, suggest possible answers, refine their claims

and support them with evidence. They can communicate their findings clearly

and pursue enquiries with independence.

We also want our students to be able to answer these three key questions throughout the 3 years of KS3 History:

•                How has the life of an ordinary British person changed over time?

•                How has the relationship between the state and the people changed over time?

•                How have different migratory groups changed Britain?